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Capilene® Air

IS IT TIME TO
CHANGE YOUR
UNDERWEAR?

IS IT TIME TO
CHANGE YOUR
UNDERWEAR?

Peter Brandon braces himself against a strong gust while preparing to rappel off Mt. Katahdin's Knife Edge in foggy and windy conditions. Baxter State Park, ME. BRENT DOSCHER

Capilene® Air

Our Most Innovative Baselayer Ever

Our warmest baselayer features a unique
airblasted yarn knit into a seamless 3-D
structure for nearly weightless warmth and
increased airflow with minimal material
waste in the creation process.

51%

responsibly sourced merino wool

49%

recycled
polyester

Capilene® Air

Our Most Innovative Baselayer Ever

Our warmest baselayer features a unique
airblasted yarn knit into a seamless 3-D
structure for nearly weightless warmth and
increased airflow with minimal material
waste in the creation process.

51%

responsibly sourced merino wool

49%

recycled
polyester

Responsibly Sourced Wool

Merino wool from New Zealand blended
with recycled polyester.

Merino wool from New Zealand blended
with recycled polyester.

3D Knit

Seamless 3-D construction eliminates chafe
points through the entire garment and has
almost no wasted material.

Seamless 3-D construction eliminates chafe
points through the entire garment and has
almost no wasted material.

Seamless Construction

A unique airblasted yarn technique,
seamless 3D structure, and super soft blend
of 49% recycled polyester and 51%
responsibly sourced merino wool make this
nearly weightless, warm and breathable
baselayer nearly revolutionary.

A unique airblasted yarn technique,
seamless 3D structure, and super soft
blend of 49% recycled polyester and 51%
responsibly sourced merino wool make
this nearly weightless, warm and
breathable baselayer nearly revolutionary.

Layering with
Capilene Air

Patagonia pioneered the concept of layering four
decades ago and we've been coming up with new
ways to do it ever since. That's because next-to-skin
performance is a critical element of every kit.

Layering with
Capilene Air

Patagonia pioneered the concept of layering
four decades ago and we've been coming up
with new ways to do it ever since. That's
because next-to-skin performance is a critical
element of every kit.

Anne Gilbert Chase

Anne Gilbert Chase

Mount Nilkantha, Indian Himalaya

View Kit

Luke Nelson

Luke Nelson

Nolan’s 14, Sawatch Range, Colorado

View Kit

Alex Yoder

Alex Yoder

Northern, Norway

View Kit

Anne Gilbert Chase

Anne Gilbert Chase

Mount Nilkantha, Indian Himalaya

View Kit

Luke Nelson

Luke Nelson

Nolan’s 14, Sawatch Range, Colorado

View Kit

Alex Yoder

Alex Yoder

Northern, Norway

View Kit

MIKEY SCHAEFER

Anne Gilbert Chase

Mount Nilkantha, Indian Himalaya

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Anne Gilbert Chase kicking it in some high altitude warm sunshine. JASON THOMPSON

Obscured
Perception

Obscured Perception

It was a calm, clear morning when Anne Gilbert Chase stood at the top of Nilkantha with her partners Chantel Astorga and Jason Thompson. She’d been thinking about this moment for three years, ever since she first found the isolated peak while poring through The American Alpine Journal and dreaming of an unclimbed line. The southwest face was beautiful and intimidating—1,400 meters of granite, ice and snow. Weather forced a retreat in 2015, but two years later the conditions worked in their favor. After five days of climbing, the trio spent five minutes at the top, before heading back down toward the valley below.

It was a calm, clear morning when Anne Gilbert Chase stood at the top of Nilkantha with her partners Chantel Astorga and Jason Thompson. She’d been thinking about this moment for three years, ever since she first found the isolated peak while poring through The American Alpine Journal and dreaming of an unclimbed line. The southwest face was beautiful and intimidating—1,400 meters of granite, ice and snow. Weather forced a retreat in 2015, but two years later the conditions worked in their favor. After five days of climbing, the trio spent five minutes at the top, before heading back down toward the valley below.

Luke Nelson

Nolan’s 14, Sawatch Range, Colorado

close
Luke Nelson and Jared Campbell tick off a classic Collegiate Peaks twofer, Mount Belford and Mount Oxford, while attempting to set a new Nolan's 14 FKT. FREDRIK MARMSATER

This is what you signed up for

This is what you signed up for

The worst moment came somewhere around hour 33. Luke Nelson and Jared Campbell stood on top of Missouri—just a little over halfway into their 53 hour and 29 minute Nolan’s 14 attempt—and Luke cracked. “I couldn’t identify the final summit, and I totally broke down,” he said. “I told Jared I couldn’t do it. I couldn’t go on. He just looked at me and said, ‘This is what you signed up for.

The worst moment came somewhere around hour 33. Luke Nelson and Jared Campbell stood on top of Missouri—just a little over halfway into their 53 hour and 29 minute Nolan’s 14 attempt—and Luke cracked. “I couldn’t identify the final summit, and I totally broke down,” he said. “I told Jared I couldn’t do it. I couldn’t go on. He just looked at me and said, ‘This is what you signed up for.

Alex Yoder

Northern, Norway

close
ANDREW MILLER

Waves and Snow

Waves and Snow

It took three years to put together, but Alex Yoder and the Gentemstick crew finally realized an idea for a three-week surf and snowboard trip in northern Norway. They slept in RVs and passed through sparsely populated towns—notorious for overwhelmingly smelly fish-drying operations—and kept the heat off to save propane. For the first three days they got lucky with waves and surfed water so cold that they wore baselayers under drysuits. With the snow conditions, they weren’t quite as lucky. The terrain was fun, but in the end, the avalanche danger was too high.

It took three years to put together, but Alex Yoder and the Gentemstick crew finally realized an idea for a three-week surf and snowboard trip in northern Norway. They slept in RVs and passed through sparsely populated towns—notorious for overwhelmingly smelly fish-drying operations—and kept the heat off to save propane. For the first three days they got lucky with waves and surfed water so cold that they wore baselayers under drysuits. With the snow conditions, they weren’t quite as lucky. The terrain was fun, but in the end, the avalanche danger was too high.