Product Safety Recall

Due to safety concerns about the snaps on the Infant Capilene® Midweight Set, we are implementing a recall of units purchased between August 1, 2021, and January 12, 2023. For more information, including how to identify this product, how to return it and how to get a full refund, please click the link below.

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Rappel de produit pour cause de sécurité

En raison de préoccupations en matière de sécurité concernant les boutons-pression des ensembles Infant Capilene® Midweight, nous procédons au rappel de toutes les unités achetées entre le 1ᵉʳ août 2021 et le 12 janvier 2023. Pour obtenir des renseignements supplémentaires, notamment sur la façon de reconnaître ce produit, de le retourner et d’obtenir un remboursement complet, veuillez cliquer sur le lien ci-dessous.

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Earth Is Now Our Only Shareholder

If we have any hope of a thriving planet—much less a business—it is going to take all of us doing what we can with the resources we have. This is what we can do.

Read Yvon’s Letter

Plastics are essential to building durable, high-performance products. But they’re also accelerating the environmental crisis, from the fossil fuels used to make plastics to the solid waste pollution that piles up once they’ve been tossed. Here’s why we still use plastics, what we’re doing to reduce our impact and why we need action at the individual, business and government levels to address the problem.

Our closets are filled with fossil fuels.

Plastic (aka synthetic) fibers are a literal thread tying the clothing industry to the oil and gas industry. Most plastic fibers begin as crude oil, which is distilled into chemicals like ethyne, and are then heated and transformed into everything from single-use plastic bottles to clothing fibers like polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyester. The UN estimates that 60% of clothing is made from these types of plastics. By 2030, it’s expected to reach 73%. That’s welcome news for Big Oil and gas. As transportation moves away from fossil fuels, experts say plastic will become a lucrative way for the industry to offset that reduced demand.

But the problem goes beyond using petroleum as a source for raw material. Burning fossil fuels to create those synthetic materials is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. Those emissions warm the planet, increase ocean acidification and release harmful—sometimes toxic—air pollutants.

Every piece of plastic ever made is still on the planet.

Plastic persists in our environment indefinitely (unless it's been incinerated or launched into space on a satellite or spacecraft). According to the Environmental Protection Agency, less than 10% of plastic in the US is actually recycled, 16% is burned, and the rest piles up in landfills, releasing greenhouse gases, impacting wildlife habitats and posing a risk to air and water quality.

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